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Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2008 Honig Schlucht Pinot Meunier

Clear, medium intensity, ruby red, bright. Clean nose, medium intensity aromas of red fruit, cherry, cranberry, strawberry, fresh mushroom, leaves, evergreen forest, dried flowers, baking spice, and bacon fat. Dry on the palate, elegant, medium-light body, medium to medium-high acidity, medium-low tannin, medium flavor intensity: red fruit, cherry, cranberry, apple skin, tart fruit, raspberry, dried violet. Medium-short finish. Pair with pasta in a red pepper sauce or herb-crusted pork tenderloin with raspberry glaze. Highly Recommended.
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Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2009 Viña Casablanca Nimbus Estate Single Vineyard Pinot Noir

An interesting wine, an eye-opener for Chile's potential with pinot noir. This is big and sweet, more Russian River than Côte d'Or. A melange of red fruits—cherry, cranberry, and strawberry—are joined by marjoram, sage, a touch of charcoal, and the tiniest hint of cayenne pepper. The mouth feel is silky and rich, the tannins sweet, smooth, and just slightly dusty, with a good acid counter-balance. Drink with Cuban roast pork. Highly recommended.
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Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2005 Miguel Torres Santa Digna Sauvignon Blanc “Selection”

Found this 2005 forgotten in the basement and brought it up for dinner tonight. What a great surprise! It was a bit warm but I twisted open the screwcap and sweet grass and herbs wafted out. The aromas persisted upon pouring: more sweet meadow herbs, a bit of limestone. On the palate, plenty of body, great balance, but the finish was a bit on the short side. Reminiscent of a very good white Bordeaux, with an appealing strain of chalkiness running through it. Highly recommended.
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Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2009 Baptiste Cuvelier Cuvée Del Maule

In 2009 the Cauquenes region of Chile suffered a terrible earthquake, and therein lies a tale of temblors and terroir. The earthquake wrought significant destruction there, and the winery did not go untouched. Barrels were thrown everywhere. Winemaker Baptiste Cuvelier picked from surviving barrels, and made the best blend possible from what survived, producing a startlingly good wine. All the grapes are fair trade and are grown organically. The wine is very well balanced, with good tannins and bright acids dancing together, promising significant cellar time. It is spicy, rich, and minty. The spice is black pepper and a touch of cinnamon. Richness comes from a blend of black and red fruits, blackcurrant, mulberry, and raspberry together, along with a bit of tobacco leaf and coffee. It also has a very interesting touch of mint, like the inside stripe of an Andes (get it?) mint without the chocolate. Vanilla from the wood makes an appearance on the mid-palate. Tannins are very sweet, the finish quite long. This is a surprisingly good wine, carved from a tragedy, and some of the proceeds will be returned to the region for ongoing earthquake relief. And it just tastes delicious. Highly recommended.