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Everything Sparkles on New Year’s

There’s nothing like popping the cork on a bottle of bubbly when the clock strikes midnight. As the big night approaches, it’s worth learning the differences between sparkling wines to figure out which ones you’re going to purchase to ring in 2013.
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2009 Adami Vigneto Giardino Brut

Very ripe pears on the nose when cold. As it warms to drinking temperature, there's a floral overlay in both nose and flavor. Tastes deep and toasty, with elements of perry (pear cider) followed by a finish with some nice acidity. The fruit flavors bloom when paired with food. Classic Prosecco.
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NV Adami Bosco di Gica Brut Prosecco

Begins with light aromas of pears and apple blossoms. Floral in both aroma and flavor, with pears and apples for fruit. Despite its lightness, does pair well with a number of foods, including fish and seafood. You could start the evening with this and continue through the first course of the meal.
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The Gentleman of Prosecco: Remembering Antonio Carpenè Jr.

All over the world, the word Prosecco is synonymous with a fun, vibrant Italian sparkling wine, isn’t it? In America, for example, there are hundreds of thousands people who are avid fans of this Italian wine. Yet, despite its festive personality, we are in mourning for one of the great fathers of Prosecco wine. Antonio Carpenè, Jr. died on April 25, 2010 at the age of 97.
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N.V. Flor Prosecco

Flor is a fragrant and refreshing sparkler full of citrus and stone fruit flavors. The bubbles are fine and the mousse is creamy, with a nutty undertone. Flor has just the sort of palate-cleansing acidity you want when eating up things like the melted, gooey, cheesey goodness of raclette.