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2010 Ceretto Blange Langhe Arneis

Very fresh aromas waft from the glass, and limestone is the first thing to hit the palate. It’s even a bit spritzy on the tongue at first. Flavor layers range from well-vinified fruit to underlying sherry. With citrus in the finish, it would be tempting to dismiss this wine as a Sauvignon Blanc-wannabe, but this white has much more muscle, finishing very strongly. Drink with anything from pasta to sausage. Recommended. BSE
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2009 Borgogno Barbera d’Alba Superiore

All over Europe, 2009 often yielded some ripe and expressive wines with intense aromatics yet good balance—we’re talking ripe, but not overheated. The 2009 Borgogno Barbera d’Alba Superiore is no exception. It shows gorgeous and intense aromas and flavors of cherry, with a dash of spice to give it character, and a long, lovely finish, with enough acidity to avoid it being overrun by the ripe red fruit character. A fun wine at a very reasonable price. Recommended.
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Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2006 Produttori del Barbaresco

Co-ops are usually the volume-first, quality-second institutions of the wine world. Not so with Produttori del Barbaresco, a group of 19 producers in the Barbaresco appellation who work together to produce some of the best wines in all of Piedmont, and at remarkably reasonable prices. Italian wine expert Charles Scicolone, in an interview I had the chance of doing with him last year, told me he considered Produttori as the best Barbaresco producer, bar none, and after tasting a few of their bottlings, I tend to agree. The 2006 “regular” Barbaresco (as opposed to their single vineyard bottlings), is clearly built for the long run, with fine but significant tannins, loads of great tart cherry and tobacco leaf aromas, a fine acidity and a terrific, clean, precise finish. The color is the clear garnet of traditional nebbiolo, free of oak (why would that grape need it?), fine and well-defined. Buy every bottle you find and drink them slowly over the next twenty years. Also look for their Langhe Nebbiolo, a simpler, fun expression of nebbiolo that is a real deal at less than $20 CDN. Highly recommended.
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2006 Produttori del Barbaresco

Co-ops are usually the volume-first, quality-second institutions of the wine world. Not so with Produttori del Barbaresco, a group of 19 producers in the Barbaresco appellation who work together to produce some of the best wines in all of Piedmont, and at remarkably reasonable prices. Italian wine expert Charles Scicolone, in an interview I had the chance of doing with him last year, told me he considered Produttori as the best Barbaresco producer, bar none, and after tasting a few of their bottlings, I tend to agree. The 2006 “regular” Barbaresco (as opposed to their single vineyard bottlings), is clearly built for the long run, with fine but significant tannins, loads of great tart cherry and tobacco leaf aromas, a fine acidity and a terrific, clean, precise finish. The color is the clear garnet of traditional nebbiolo, free of oak (why would that grape need it?), fine and well-defined. Buy every bottle you find and drink them slowly over the next twenty years. Also look for their Langhe Nebbiolo, a simpler, fun expression of nebbiolo that is a real deal at less than $20 CDN. Highly recommended.
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2008 Renato Ratti Dolcetto d’Alba Colombe

The wine is light, fruity, and tart. The fruits are all red, raspberry, cranberry, and a little sour cherry. It also has some warm, toasty flavors from light use of wood, and a bit of cinnamon. Tannins are very light, but present. Acid, on the other hand, is there by the bucketful, giving a tingling, almost effervescent sensation. Drink with roasted chestnuts.
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Unearthing A New Group of Wineries in Piedmont

Driving around the enigmatic, fog-shrouded Piedmont region of Italy, I saw steep vineyards that fall away from the winding, mountain roads, and medieval castles looming out of the haze on every other hilltop. I recalled the great Barolo and Barbaresco wines from this region are made from the nebbiolo grape—and nebbia is the Italian word for fog. Why was I wending my way through this misty part of northern Italy? To learn about wine and terroir—and sales, too.
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2000 Moccagatta Barbaresco Basarin

Long, dense, and generally not my style of Nebbiolo... but this wine turns the trick of amping up without losing the varietal character. A nice current of iron flows through to make sure the sweet fruit doesn't become cloying. It gets pretty oaky without being a jerk about it. Beautiful with butternut squash / beef stew.