article placeholder

2008 Renato Ratti Dolcetto d’Alba Colombe

The wine is light, fruity, and tart. The fruits are all red, raspberry, cranberry, and a little sour cherry. It also has some warm, toasty flavors from light use of wood, and a bit of cinnamon. Tannins are very light, but present. Acid, on the other hand, is there by the bucketful, giving a tingling, almost effervescent sensation. Drink with roasted chestnuts.
article placeholder

Unearthing A New Group of Wineries in Piedmont

Driving around the enigmatic, fog-shrouded Piedmont region of Italy, I saw steep vineyards that fall away from the winding, mountain roads, and medieval castles looming out of the haze on every other hilltop. I recalled the great Barolo and Barbaresco wines from this region are made from the nebbiolo grape—and nebbia is the Italian word for fog. Why was I wending my way through this misty part of northern Italy? To learn about wine and terroir—and sales, too.
article placeholder

2000 Moccagatta Barbaresco Basarin

Long, dense, and generally not my style of Nebbiolo... but this wine turns the trick of amping up without losing the varietal character. A nice current of iron flows through to make sure the sweet fruit doesn't become cloying. It gets pretty oaky without being a jerk about it. Beautiful with butternut squash / beef stew.
article placeholder

2000 Bruno Rocca Barbaresco Rabajà

Hedonistic but hardly recognizable as Nebbiolo. The nose evokes some of the hot vintages in the southern Rhone, with fig cake and jam. Dense, with rich and chocolate-covered fruit. The finish is halted by a wall of drying tannins that clearly need to settle in. Needs time, and it needs a consumer who doesn't care too much for a wine's sense of place. Just please me, baby!