article placeholder

Il Dimenticato: Piedmont’s New White Star Has a Mysterious and Forgotten Past

A thick tome, 132 years old, has survived to tell the story of Piedmont's grape-growing past. That is, if you can decipher the flowery penmanship and wade through the anachronistic turns of phrase. There, in a section on grape varieties in the book called “Wine Production and Oenology in the Province of Cuneo, 1879”, lies both the question and, perhaps, the answer to one of the region's great mysteries.
article placeholder

Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2010 Montalbera Ruchè di Castagnole Monferrato L’Accento

Light, translucent ruby in color. Strawberries dominate on the nose. Strawberries and rhubarb are on the palate, tart, clean, and brightly acidic. Fennel pops on the mid-palate. Tannins are light and very fine. This is a bright food wine, one to provide counter-balance to rich cheeses and light meats. Drink with ravioli stuffed with spinach or veal ravioli. Highly Recommended. DH
article placeholder

2010 Montalbera Ruchè di Castagnole Monferrato L’Accento

Light, translucent ruby in color. Strawberries dominate on the nose. Strawberries and rhubarb are on the palate, tart, clean, and brightly acidic. Fennel pops on the mid-palate. Tannins are light and very fine. This is a bright food wine, one to provide counter-balance to rich cheeses and light meats. Drink with ravioli stuffed with spinach or veal ravioli. Highly Recommended. DH
article placeholder

2010 Ceretto Blange Langhe Arneis

Very fresh aromas waft from the glass, and limestone is the first thing to hit the palate. It’s even a bit spritzy on the tongue at first. Flavor layers range from well-vinified fruit to underlying sherry. With citrus in the finish, it would be tempting to dismiss this wine as a Sauvignon Blanc-wannabe, but this white has much more muscle, finishing very strongly. Drink with anything from pasta to sausage. Recommended. BSE
article placeholder

2009 Borgogno Barbera d’Alba Superiore

All over Europe, 2009 often yielded some ripe and expressive wines with intense aromatics yet good balance—we’re talking ripe, but not overheated. The 2009 Borgogno Barbera d’Alba Superiore is no exception. It shows gorgeous and intense aromas and flavors of cherry, with a dash of spice to give it character, and a long, lovely finish, with enough acidity to avoid it being overrun by the ripe red fruit character. A fun wine at a very reasonable price. Recommended.
article placeholder

Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2006 Produttori del Barbaresco

Co-ops are usually the volume-first, quality-second institutions of the wine world. Not so with Produttori del Barbaresco, a group of 19 producers in the Barbaresco appellation who work together to produce some of the best wines in all of Piedmont, and at remarkably reasonable prices. Italian wine expert Charles Scicolone, in an interview I had the chance of doing with him last year, told me he considered Produttori as the best Barbaresco producer, bar none, and after tasting a few of their bottlings, I tend to agree. The 2006 “regular” Barbaresco (as opposed to their single vineyard bottlings), is clearly built for the long run, with fine but significant tannins, loads of great tart cherry and tobacco leaf aromas, a fine acidity and a terrific, clean, precise finish. The color is the clear garnet of traditional nebbiolo, free of oak (why would that grape need it?), fine and well-defined. Buy every bottle you find and drink them slowly over the next twenty years. Also look for their Langhe Nebbiolo, a simpler, fun expression of nebbiolo that is a real deal at less than $20 CDN. Highly recommended.
article placeholder

2006 Produttori del Barbaresco

Co-ops are usually the volume-first, quality-second institutions of the wine world. Not so with Produttori del Barbaresco, a group of 19 producers in the Barbaresco appellation who work together to produce some of the best wines in all of Piedmont, and at remarkably reasonable prices. Italian wine expert Charles Scicolone, in an interview I had the chance of doing with him last year, told me he considered Produttori as the best Barbaresco producer, bar none, and after tasting a few of their bottlings, I tend to agree. The 2006 “regular” Barbaresco (as opposed to their single vineyard bottlings), is clearly built for the long run, with fine but significant tannins, loads of great tart cherry and tobacco leaf aromas, a fine acidity and a terrific, clean, precise finish. The color is the clear garnet of traditional nebbiolo, free of oak (why would that grape need it?), fine and well-defined. Buy every bottle you find and drink them slowly over the next twenty years. Also look for their Langhe Nebbiolo, a simpler, fun expression of nebbiolo that is a real deal at less than $20 CDN. Highly recommended.