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NV Sumac Ridge Sparking Gewürztraminer – Okanagan Valley, BC

When first poured, the wine shared aromas of citrus and tropical fruits, along with floral and honey notes and an exotic spiciness. The palate, however, didn't produce what my nose told me to expect. At all. I got some floral, spice, and citrus on the palate, but the elements didn't come together. I found its sweetness cloying, not in harmony with its acidity and fruit. To read more about this wine, visit Kathleen’s blog post on Between the Vines.
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2007 Rollingdale La Droite – Okanagan Valley, BC

This wine is a red-wine blend made up of 94% Merlot, with the balance comprised of Cabernet sauvignon (3.8%), Malbec (2%), and Cabernet franc (0.2%). As soon as I brought this wine to my nose, I started enjoying it: aromas of red fruit, wet stones and spice. On the palate I found juicy berries, ripe cherries, plums and spice. The wine filled my mouth with a roundness that wasn't the least bit "mushy"—the acidity made the wine bright and the gentle tannins gave it structure. And boy did it go well with the chicken pot pie. Just one caution: drink it when you pour it. To read more about this wine, visit Kathleen’s blog post on Between the Vines.
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Sumac Ridge Tribute “Silver” Sparkling Wine

One can be content with the silver, in this case. It is a pleasant, crisp traditional method sparkling wine, made from 100% chardonnay. Lemon and citrus aromas, with a touch of toasted bread, on the nose, and apple and a touch of pear on the palate, with plenty of lively bubbles to give it a true sense of celebration. Not terribly complex, but neat and well-made enough to keep you smiling through the final hockey game - where silver, however, will not keep Canadians content.
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From Backwater to Next Big Thing?

Did you know that British Columbia is a growing wine region with hundreds of wineries? Chances are you’re aware, but not familiar. Many wine enthusiasts are aware that a wine industry is developing in this Canadian province north of Washington State, and yet almost no one outside of British Columbia (BC) can access these wines, significantly impairing familiarity.