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2007 Rutini Wines Trumpeter Malbec – Mendoza, Argentina

I held this a little longer than usual for a wine at this price point, and was rewarded with spicy black and red fruit. Elderberry, black and red raspberry, and black pepper, all with violet undertones, flowed through the glass. There is still wood, but the vanilla and touch of cedar complement, rather than overwhelm, the fruit. The finish is short, but good for the price point. Even better, at three years of age, this gem might be found in you local store's bargain bin. If it is, grab them all. Even if it isn't, at this price why not grab enough to get you through the summer? This would be a great match with burgers or steaks on the grill.
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2007 Rollingdale La Droite – Okanagan Valley, BC

This wine is a red-wine blend made up of 94% Merlot, with the balance comprised of Cabernet sauvignon (3.8%), Malbec (2%), and Cabernet franc (0.2%). As soon as I brought this wine to my nose, I started enjoying it: aromas of red fruit, wet stones and spice. On the palate I found juicy berries, ripe cherries, plums and spice. The wine filled my mouth with a roundness that wasn't the least bit "mushy"—the acidity made the wine bright and the gentle tannins gave it structure. And boy did it go well with the chicken pot pie. Just one caution: drink it when you pour it. To read more about this wine, visit Kathleen’s blog post on Between the Vines.
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The Lagrézette Challenge: The Verdict on Le Pigeonnier 1999

As we drove slowly around the estate, passing the old 17th Century pigeon house that stood as a portent of what had brought me to Château Lagrézette, I took a good look around me and thought that this was a truly magnificent place: the 16th Century Château, with its four round towers and elegant shape, the woods that surround it, the location, everything was pretty much picture perfect.
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Getting Ready for the Lagrézette challenge and International Malbec Days

On the left, a glass of 2007 Zuccardi Q Mendoza Malbec. On the right, a glass of 2004 Château Lagrézette Cahors—also a Malbec. The Zuccardi is fruitier, with slightly jammy overtones and good structure (though the acidity seems a little out of place), while the Cahors has an earthier, more brooding presence with more substantial, velvety tannins and great length.