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Palate Press Wine of the Week: 2010 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages Nouveau

A far better offering than its sister Beaujolais Nouveau wine for nearly the same price. This one has nice hints of strawberry and even cedar on the nose. Diving into it (not literally, of course) yields more tannic backbone holding up bright, lively flavors of cherry jam and a hint of allspice. It finishes with a slightly lingering flourish, which while not memorable, is still pleasant. This one is a nice holiday wine, especially with something like roast duck with cherry sauce.
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2010 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais-Villages Nouveau

A far better offering than its sister Beaujolais Nouveau wine for nearly the same price. This one has nice hints of strawberry and even cedar on the nose. Diving into it (not literally, of course) yields more tannic backbone holding up bright, lively flavors of cherry jam and a hint of allspice. It finishes with a slightly lingering flourish, which while not memorable, is still pleasant. This one is a nice holiday wine, especially with something like roast duck with cherry sauce.
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2010 Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Nouveau

Full disclosure notice: I’ve never been a big fan of most of these wines, finding them geared more toward marketing ploy than the palate. Approaching this one even with an open mind unfortunately confirms my prejudices. A nose of overripe berries and apples is somewhat promising but the follow through is both surprising and disappointing. The fruit seems short and tart, especially for a Nouveau—more like cranberry—and the finish is short. Even if you like this sort of thing, I cannot, even putting my predilections aside, recommend this one. The Nouveau Villages, however, is another matter; stay tuned!
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Natural Wine: On a Practical Note…

So here I was, last spring, talking away with the recently-departed Marcel Lapierre, the Beaujolais vigneron who was one of the dominant figures of the natural wine movement in its strictest definition—organic in the vineyard, wine made with grape juice only, nothing added (not even sulfur), nothing taken out. And as we got into discussing the risks of wild fermentations without sulfur, I asked him what he recommended doing if a fermentation went off in the wrong direction, with undesirable microorganisms like Brettanomyces taking over the wine’s development.
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Saying Goodbye to Marcel Lapierre

The natural wine world lost one of its leading figures, Sunday night, when Beaujolais winemaker Marcel Lapierre died after a long battle with melanoma. From his vineyards in the Morgon cru of Beaujolais, Lapierre had become a champion of natural wine, strictly defined as organic in the vineyard, and wild yeast fermentations with nothing taken out and nothing added in, including SO2.