article placeholder

A Family Winery, From Growers to Empire Via One Guy

Grape growers and winemakers in Paso started trying out a few different wine styles, including Rhône and Bordeaux. This meant, basically, syrah-based wines and cabernet-based wines. Then some mavericks came in and mixed the two, creating cabernet-syrah blends. Traditionalists cringed, but people started trying the wines and found they were pretty darn good.
article placeholder

Rhone Rangers Tasting at Pier 59 Studios

“In a world of recognizable Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, Syrah ends up being a consumer’s third choice,” says Steffanie Anglim. Still a tough sell for wholesalers and restaurants, Syrah tends to sell well in the tasting room, a common observation among wineries. As a former wine bartender, this fact makes sense to me.
article placeholder

2006 Robert Hall Rhône de Robles – Central Coast

This moderately priced Rhône blend spent 14 months in a blend of French and European oak, and it shows. There is plenty of cherry and a little rhubarb, but the wood is slathered all over the fruit, overwhelming it. Sweet tannins and a maple flavor are wood-derived, making a difficult food match. Not recommended.
article placeholder

2007 Liberty School Central Coast Syrah

First Aromas of cedar and cherry, followed by the promise of earthiness. Later, candied florals emerge. Deep plum red color with an undertone of brown bears out the promise: this is European-style in flavor and acidity, but New World in its apparent low tannins and mild finish.